Marketing Essentials Every Podcaster Should Know

Starting a podcast is fun, exciting and bit daunting at times as you wade through all the education on the “How To’s.” The not-so-fun part of it is the marketing portion as to how actually grow your audience base. Here’s a presentation I recently did on behalf of Magruder Laser Vision regarding both QueensCast.com and marketing your podcast in general.

Posted on November 7, 2018 and filed under Blogging, Business, Process.

The Care & Feeding of Creative Professionals – Part 3

What are some of the common mistakes that you see people who seek a career in any of these fields make as they pursue that career?

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  • IMPORTANT: Young creatives think they understand the client and the agency. They think they could do 'all of this' better and will often not stick around long as they seek to emerge from this boring chrysalis of doom and make the coolest agency ever — and it will have a beer tap in the kitchen (and a foosball table). 

  • If in the rarest of circumstances you find someone that believes in your clients, is great at what they do, is well liked by the clients and can show a consistent effort – place golden-handcuffs on them ASAP and bring them up in the org chart. NOTE: this person is usually a woman.

  • We hate revisions. Client: "Well, what do you think of this design?" Us: <thinking> I think it's fucking brilliant bitch, that's why I'm presenting it. </thinking>


"As I’ve moderated ideation sessions over the past two decades, I’ve noticed one shocking point about creatives. They tend to come up with far fewer ideas than everyone else. 

It’s not because they can’t; it’s because they become too attached to every idea. Rather than jot it down and move to the next, creatives keep working on and rereading their own ideas. 

You know which discipline consistently comes up with the most ideas? Developers."Dave Linabury

This point is well suited for this conversation. Creatives (as outlined above) often get too attached to a concept. Therefore, external (of the creative department) concept sessions are not only valuable, but they're also essential.

ANY PERSON can make an idea great. It could be the front desk guy, the janitor or CFO. Create a think tank session, even if it's just one time, where anyone can participate. 

EXAMPLE: I was working a project for the US Navy, we were to create an immersive experiential training simulation for them. We emailed everyone and asked if anyone in the office had any insight into training, past or current. Turns out that friend of the agency had a family member that had a lifetime career of creating these types of scenarios. We brought them in and the project rapidly took off from there. Had that room been simply creatives folks with no real-world experience, I believe our results would have been a failure.


You might ask yourself at this point "how is this helping me avoiding mistakes?" It usually takes years for people to come to the understanding that most mistakes 'take a village' to create. The better you understand yourself, and those around you, the better you can apply your skills to actual work.


Lastly, I think it's important to add that this is not a list of deficiencies, or short-comings – it's who we are as a people. Creatives are a very special breed of people, we create emotion, education, allow others to journey through our visions to unexplored destinations.

The Care & Feeding of Creative Professionals – Part 2

What are some of the common mistakes that you see people who seek a career in any of these fields make as they pursue that career?

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  • We often assume that something was done by someone else. Make no mistake, if we think something's done and we can start something new – it's dead to us. 

  • We only like our creative [in the moment]; long creative projects will make creatives very unhappy.
    We don't want to dress up, our office is a mess, and we always want the latest gear, tools, fonts, apps, etc. But we're afraid of using them because that creates change, and we fear change. We're overly protective of the creative we make – the byproduct of the creative process is like making a child, or a 'thing' we have a passion for. 

  • Therefore, we'll needlessly defend it and often aggravate the client in the process. Moreover, make sure that within the creative practice you do the 'holy trinity' regarding concepts

    1) EXACTLY what the client asked for.

    2) Use the client's request as a basis for the creative but feel free to take strong liberties with it.

    3) A total wildcard idea that's completely unexpected and something the creative will enjoy doing.

  • We want to be humble but we also want positive affirmation for our efforts. 

  • Creatives are not morning people. 

  • A sense of "play" is important. Treating them too ‘adult’ can be counter productive.

  • Timelines are important.

  • While clients are not always right, we need them to believe they are.

  • When a creative asks you to see something (even if it's not completed) they usually DON'T want constructive criticism, they want to be petted. That said, start with "I like what you've done ..." and ease into the suggestion process.

  • We have problem finishing designs — we think "Has it (the design) been pushed far enough? Could it be better? What needs to change?" Often convincing that "if we add too much more it could kill it", will get them to settle.

  • Creatives SUCK at time tracking. Give them tools and techniques to clock-in and out of projects. Monitor this properly as we often drift from one directive to another, having come up with awesome addition (of course), but we'll virtually never stop to splice time.

  • Keep them caffeinated.

The Care & Feeding of Creative Professionals – Part 1

Recently I was asked: What are some of the common mistakes that you see people who seek a career in any of these fields make as they pursue that career?

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Some of the common mistakes that I've seen in my career are usually attention to detail(s). Proofreading a print advertisement, submitting an order amount wrong, or typos on presentation decks.

You will come to find that creative people share similar traits, this is a generalization to be sure, but there's a likelihood you'll find one if not more in most marketing professionals:

Many of us have ADHD, this is not figuratively speaking, a lot of us do. Diagnosed or not. Knowing this will allow you to coat the next following list:

  • The biggest shit-storm one can create is to have a vague, or non-existent, creative brief. Creatives are just that — CREATIVE. A creative brief should give, at least the initial idea, and some parameters to reign in their thought process initially. (e.g. If the client has a brand standards manual, fonts, specified voice or defined goal objective) During the creative process of the 'client-only' edition of the project, we more often than not, come up with a slew of new ways to shape the original concept.

  • We get distracted. Allow us to listen to music, background noise, or whatever allows us to get "in the zone." Busy agencies that create atmospheres of account executives (AEs) or related, consistently asking your creatives questions will delay the completion of a project and in many cases, the creative will suffer.

  • We're slow to do the jobs we HAVE to do and ATTACK the jobs we want to do. We often have pissing contests over who got what project.

  • We are terrible spellers (as I write this in Grammarly) – check our shit, again and again. Of course, it's important to remember that your creative IS NOT your proofing person.

  • On tasking: checklists will help. Daily huddles will help as well, as long as we hear what we want to hear and forget the rest (see jobs we HAVE to do above).

  • Most of us suck at math. Give us the sizes of the ad! Tasking us to research this is like throwing money away.

  • Remind us, again and again on the due dates. This is why daily huddles are beneficial.

What are your favorite truths about creatives?