Posts filed under Process

Social Media Posts Can Make For A Hotbed of Testing

I hear it a lot; how do I get started with "A/B" testing? I agree that it's not as simple as diversifying your email subject line and hope to make a monumental business lift. Moreover, more and more businesses are doing their marketing internally and therefore, don't have creative agencies that might do spending against focus groups, or do preemptive testing within a crowdfunding environment. Lastly, if you are dealing with an agency or creative house, you know that it can be extremely costly to make large campaign shifts.

Enter social media posts —

One of the many things that you could do is to create a "one-off" piece of creative and run as a social media post against your primary channels. It's not to say that you will have an overabundance of success with one particular post. However, boosting/promoting posts is relatively inexpensive, can be done in a short period of time, and can render even if minimal analytical results that you contest against. You'd be suprised how often this little trick is overlooked.

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The agency likes it. The agency sells it well and the client likes it. Then off it goes with minimal testing (in some cases) if any testing and you're DUMPING scads of budget against a 6-month runner and praying for results. See the nice part about social media posting is not only can you test variability against large differentiations in creative but you can then dial in one piece and test subtle teaks to the CTAs and actionable offers.

The key to doing A/B testing was social media post is not much different than anything– be consistent with each one. Don't favor any particular piece of creative and assign the same amount of money to each individual insert as its own campaign – say one week at $100.

Once you've received your analytics back after the week, start to make tweaks against a silo'd campaign (while you test another creative outside of this directive) that has variations in specific attributes of called to action and content of the offer. Each time you rotate a cycle of creative, be sure to analyze your cost-per-action (or acquisition) dependent upon your business model. From there, as you adjust your creative spend, more money can be applied to the granularity in messaging to ensure the best combination of elements is working for you.

Now when you start down the path of ramping up a budget to a larger more complex content deliverable, like OTT or influencer campaign, you can do so with the knowledge that you've done far more than passive testing to ensure success.

Here’s an examples of a couple of creative pieces from various “micro-campaigns” that we’re testing online.

Posted on August 19, 2019 and filed under Advertising, Strategy, Process.

Krav Maga Marketing For Big Fish

Whether you're an agency, influencer or someone just trying to impress, you have to go the extra mile to make that first impression. I award the agency PUSH, in Orlando Florida (where I once called home) for showing me that the simple act of dressing up a proposal beyond the norm might be the difference between getting the gig and being lost in the shuffle.

Such is the case with my friend (and client) David Kahn Krav Maga. Recently we share the opportunity to explore the MA Supershow in Las Vegas with an invitation from Century Martial Arts (Century). For those in the know, Century is not only a giant in the retail and martial arts school space, but they're innovators that shape the industry. Their brand umbrella own Black Belt Magazine, MADrills.com and have countless cooperative relationships with other products that support the future of this incredible marketplace.

This introduction to Century is what lead us to send them our product-pact – and when we did, we pulled out all the stops.

Posted on August 15, 2019 and filed under Brand, Business, Process.

Educating your consumer must be your key differentiator

Now more than ever, we're surrounded by media, OTT insertions, marketing bots and AI algorithms trying to find the shortest route to your spending triggers. But the truth is that more and more consumers see your messaging as nothing more than a sales pitch. Consumer want more than simply beautiful photos and lush copywriting – they want an education.

"Content is king" – if I read this from one more guru in their "new year's marketing trends that will shock you!" post, I'm going to eat a fucking bullet. Much like responsive design, if you don't know (and are implementing) it already, then you need to be reading someone else. I can't throw you a rope. That said, we need to make content into something that:

  • Creates a thorough understanding not only of your services, but what the consumer should be looking for.

  • “Opens the kimono” to offer education in a transparent way, even advocating they seek out your competitors for comparison. If what you offer is that good – they'll return; and with a built-in sense of loyalty.

  • Creates a sense that you WANT user feedback, and shows your ongoing willingness (within your contextual marketing) that you're seeking to further refine your education.

  • Crafts the perception that problems can be uniquely solved with your service.

  • Shows both the pros and cons of your products.

  • Spotlights the future growth or roadmap of said products/services. Many people (both B2C, B2B, B2E, and others) often hold great confidence in brands that show they intend to evolve their products regardless of the point at which you purchase. This, done well, will also create a sense of urgency that NOW is the time to be part of "X."

  • Holds the consumer's hand — and not in a condescending way. The more you guide them, the more apt they will be to default to you.

A few brands doing it right:

  • IKEA

  • SquareSpace

  • General Electric

Who else are you seeing online that seems to be educating, rather than selling? I look forward to your feedback.

Posted on February 27, 2019 and filed under Blogging, Brand, Process.

Stop Blogging: Best Practices and Witchcraft for Compelling Articles (Part 3)

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Cast your final spell to seek engagement!

EXAMPLE – DIY Article on "X"

  • Compelling Title

  • Open the article with what quick summary of the article is about, how it will benefit the reader and what can be gained. Perhaps even a 'bullet list' — people LOVE lists.

The WIIFM

This pays off the “what's in it for me?” (WIIFM) right away.

If you've lured them to keep reading, then you can begin breaking down the "why they need this" and fold them into the product, process or education you’re trying to share.

The more a reader commits to an article, the more likely they are to complete it. Now, there are some cases where this simply doesn't apply, like white papers or formal presentations.

BLOGGER TIP: Do you have a long-ass post like this? Cut it into logical segments and make it a multi-part post like I did here (this is part three of three). That way, one long post turns into more checkmarks on your content calendar then a single blog post that some might shy away from.

Last, and perhaps most importantly: Unless your content is strictly sales-oriented, do your best not to sell in blogs. The challenge is not to avoid talking about your products and services, but more naturally weave it into the conversation.

Example [BAD]: "The new BRAND camera is the best on the market and we're the best place for you to get it!"

Example [GOOD]: "The latest BRAND camera offers some of the newest features you're sure to love. We've been using this camera since we got the first one in, and we'll show you all the tips and tricks to take breathtaking images."

The first example is a bold call-to-action (CTA). This might work as an advertisement, but even then I doubt I'd use it. The second statemen:

  • Compliments the new product

  • Differentiates the product from its predecessors

  • Shows that, like you, we really LOVE photography

  • Conveys that we want to explore the item educationally, not simply sell it

https://maximizesocialbusiness.com/content-marketing-mantra-create-use-many-15349/

Posted on December 19, 2018 and filed under Blogging, Brand, Process.